FIRST Robotics Competition

FIRST Robotic Competition (35 students, 16 mentors) is “a varsity sport for the mind,” FIRST Robotic Competition combines the excitement of sport with the rigors of science and technology. Under strict rules, with limited time and resources, teams of 30 or more students raise funds, design a team “brand,” and hone teamwork skills to build and program robots to perform prescribed tasks against a field of competitors. It’s as close to real-world engineering as a student can get. Volunteer professional mentors lend their time and talents to guide each team. Each team builds a 36” by 40” robot, which can stand as tall as 24” and weigh 150 pounds, then competes on fields that are the size of a gym floor.

Success for our FIRST Robotics Challenge team really is about developing a team of students, supported by parents and community members, who are working together to complete a complex robot in a short-term problem-solving activity. In the process, students learn that they can be the next generation of engineers and highly skilled workers in our community. High school student’s get to:

  • Learn from professional engineers
  • Build and compete with a robot of their own design
  • Learn and use sophisticated software and hardware
  • Compete and cooperate in alliances and tournaments
  • Earn a place in the World Championship
  • Qualify for more than $14.8 million in college scholarships

PICTURE YOURSELF IN FIRST!

Are you interested in starting a robotics program?

SMART (Team #3930) is here to help you start a high school FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC) Team or a FIRST LEGO League (FLL) Team for ages 9-14.

Our FRC students and mentors offer guidance and help,as well as school and community robot demonstrations. Our team can train your newly formed FRC team in the fall of the year for the upcoming season. We offer both VEX and FRC training at our school in the fall at no cost to you. We will guide you through the process of building a robot, but more importantly how to setup and run a successful FRC program in your school. We can assist with team management; grant writing, and fundraising solutions.  We also offer online conferencing for schools at great distances and can help any size school get started, but we are very adept at supporting small rural schools like us. Any school can and should have an FRC Team! We also have experience supporting beginning FLL teams in elementary and middle schools. Our LEGO League summer day camp is available to students for very little cost for students who can travel to our school.

Program Options:

FIRST LEGO League (FLL): Start up costs about $500. LEGO League introduces 9-14 year old students to real-world engineering challenges by building LEGO-based robots to complete tasks on a thematic playing surface.  Students get to design, build, test, and program robots using LEGO MINDSTORMS® kits. They apply real-world math and science concepts and research challenges facing today’s scientists. Finally, they learn critical thinking, team-building, and presentation skills, as well as participate in tournaments and celebrations.

FIRST Robotic Competition (FRC): FRC is “a varsity sport for the mind,” FRC combines the excitement of sport with the rigors of science and technology. Under strict rules, with limited time and resources, teams of 40 or more students raise funds, design a team “brand,” and hone teamwork skills to build and program robots to perform prescribed tasks against a field of competitors. It’s as close to real-world engineering as a student can get. Volunteer professional mentors lend their time and talents to guide each team. Each team builds a 24” by 36” robot, which can stand as tall as 88” and weigh 150 pounds, then competes on fields that are the size of a gym floor.

The VEX Robotics: Start up cost Less than $1000. The VEX robotics system offers students an exciting platform for learning about areas rich with career opportunities spanning science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). These are just a few of the many fields students can explore by creating with VEX Robotics technology. Beyond science and engineering principles, a VEX Robotics project encourages teamwork, leadership and problem solving among groups.

So how can we help you?

 Spruce Mountain Area Robotic Teams (SMART)

33 Community Drive

Jay, Maine 04239

Dan Lemieux Lead FRC Mentor 207-215-7404 dlemieux@rsu73.org

Rob Taylor Lead FLL Mentor / Associate FRC Mentor

207-491-1137 rtaylor@rsu73.org

SMART Web page: http://www.SMART3930.com

Meet the Robots

2015

RECYCLE RUSHSM is a recycling-themed game played by two Alliances of three robots each. Robots score points by stacking totes on scoring platforms, capping those stacks with recycling containers, and properly disposing of pool noodles, representing litter. In keeping with the recycling theme of the game, all game pieces used are reusable or recyclable by teams in their home locations or by FIRST® at the end of the season. Each Alliance competes on their respective 26 ft. by 27 ft. side of the playing field. Each match begins with a 15-second Autonomous Period in which robots operate independently of their drivers. During this period, robots attempt to earn points by moving themselves, their yellow totes, and their recycling containers into the area between the scoring platforms, called the Auto Zone. During the remaining two minutes and 15 seconds of the match, called the Teleop Period, robots are controlled remotely by student drivers located behind the walls at the ends of the field. Teams on an Alliance work together to place as many totes on their white scoring platforms as possible. Alliances earn additional points for recycling containers placed on the scored totes, with containers at greater height earning more points. Alliances also earn points for disposing of their litter in their Landfill Zone near the center of the field, or placing litter in or on scored recycling containers. Alliances that leave litter unprocessed on their side of the field at the end of the match, not in scoring position, will add points to the score of the other Alliance. Alliances have an opportunity to earn Coopertition® points by coordinating with the other Alliance in the match. Coopertition points are awarded if, at some point in the match, there are at least four yellow totes on the step simultaneously. Coopertition points are doubled if the Alliances arrange at least four of those yellow totes in a single stack on the step.

SMART 3930 robot.

Weebles Wobble, but they don’t fall down.   Very stable.

Autonomous scoring: Robot, tote and container at same time.

Moves and work with two side by side totes at one times.

4 to 6 stack of a total of 10-16 totes depending on starting position.  

Stacks 6 totes with container in 5 lifts.

Works in Land fill zone.

 

2014 Robot: Vulcan Hammer  – the God of Fire

AERIAL ASSISTSM is played by two competing Alliances of three robots each on a flat 25’ x 54’ foot field, straddled by a truss suspended just over five feet above the floor. The objective is to score as many balls in goals as possible during a two (2)-minute and 30-second match. The more Alliances score their ball in their goals, and the more they work together to do it, the more points their Alliance receives. The match begins with one 10-second Autonomous Period in which robots operate independently of driver. Each robot may begin with a ball and attempt to score it in a goal. Alliances earn bonus points for scoring balls in this mode and for any of their robots that move in to their zones. Additionally, each high/low pair of goals will be designated “hot” for five seconds, but the order of which side is first is randomized. For each ball scored in a “hot” goal, the Alliance earns additional bonus points. For the rest of the match, drivers remotely control robots from behind a protective wall. Once all balls in autonomous are scored, only one ball is re-entered in to play, and the Alliances must cycle a single ball as many times as possible for the remainder of the match. With the single ball, they try to maximize their points earned by throwing balls over the truss, catching balls launched over the truss, and scoring in the high and low goals on the far side of the field.

Vulcan      Vulcan2

Our Goal:

Vulcan and his Greek counterpart, Hephaestus, are the gods of fire and blacksmithing, thus making them the deities of technology! Ball blocking device, great defense. Ability to score Autonomous 5+10 every time. Possible hot goal +10. If we receive the inbound we score truss shot every time 30+ per match. Mecanum drive system for easy catching and blocking. Four shots; long range; middle range; short pass; floor pass. No human play penalties. Top scoring alliance at Pine tree. 261 Points. 2nd top scoring at WPI 261 alliance points.

2014FRC TEAM

2013-14 Spruce Mountain Area Robotics Team

Seniors: Adam Gettle, Erik Taylor, Shelby Bryant, Michael Chavez, Dustin Jones, Lucas Preble Juniors: Denton Bilodeau, Sam Brenner, Tyler Ritter, Jacob Luce, Chloe Flagg, Amia Pelletier, Destiny White, Angelina Couturier, Ashley Morrell, Lucas Castonguay, Pam Gould Sophomores: Ben Nichols, Michael Herlihy, Brian Jones, Jacob Foss, Austin Greeley, Brandon Anctil, Brianna Gould, Baylee Gilboe, Amber Delaney Freshmen: Austin Gilboe, Bailey Morrell, Curtis Farmer, Devon Darling, Rachel Pike, Shane Riley, William Brenner, Kaylin Beck, Kurt Chapman, Camryn Berry Mentors Coaches: Dan Lemieux, Rob Taylor, Kim Bryant, Fred Ouellette, Tony Flagg, Donna Greeley, Michael Taylor-Hampton, Aaron Hasting, Nina Chavez, Randy Luce, Steve Gettle, Dan Anctil, Marie Jones, Joel Pike, Tina Riley.

SMART has had an extremely successful year. We received seven major awards and competed in three robotic events. We have worked hard fund-raising, training, and building robots, and we have learned to work together as a team to learn and promote STEM in our school, our community, and ourselves. With hard work, come great rewards. Thank you to everyone who has helped us becomes so successful. Awards and descriptions. Worcester Polytechnic Institute District 1) Engineering Inspiration Award (the second most prestigious award given to a team): Celebrates outstanding success in advancing respect and appreciation for engineering within a team’s school and community. 2) Industrial Safety Award: Celebrates the team that progresses beyond safety fundamentals by using innovative ways to eliminate or protect against hazards. Pine Tree District awards: 1) Finalist Award.: Awarded to the teams which compete in the final matches. 2) Industrial Safety Award. 3) Entrepreneurship Award: Celebrates the entrepreneurial spirit and recognizes a “team which has developed a comprehensive business” plan in order to define, manage and achieve team objectives. This team displays entrepreneurial enthusiasm and the vital business skills to ensure a self-sustaining program. New England Championships 1) Imagery Award: This award celebrates attractiveness in engineering and outstanding visual aesthetic integration of machine and team appearance. 2) Industrial Safety Award.

2013 Robot: Koopa Troopa

ULTIMATE ASCENTSM is played by two competing alliances on a flat, 27 x 54 foot field. Each Alliance consists of three robots, and they compete to score as many discs into their goals as they can during a two (2)-minute and fifteen (15)-second match. The higher the goal in which the disc is scored, the more points the Alliance receives. The match begins with a fifteen (15)-second Autonomous Period in which robots operate independently of driver inputs. Discs scored during this period are worth additional points. For the remainder of the match, drivers control robots and try to maximize their alliance score by scoring as many goals as possible. The match ends with robots attempting to climb up pyramids located near the middle of the field. Each robot earns points based on how high it climbs. Scoring for the match is summarized below.

Kooper

Our goals:

Shooting from a safe place is the goal. We climb for 10pts, and can drive under the pyramid.  We have a shooter that uses little power.  Our drive train gives us power  to move and push. Our innovative climber and tilt table allow us under the pyramid.

 

 

2013 FRC TEAM

2012-13 SMART Robotics members and mentors: Front row: Erik Taylor, Shelby Bryant, Dustin Jones. Second row: Kim Bryant, Steve Gettle, Chloe Flagg, Sam Brenner, James Herlihy, Adam Gettle, Nina Chavez, Amia Pelletier Third row: Tyler Ritter, Kortney Chapman, Nancy Anctil, Brian Jones, Donna Greeley, Austin Greeley, Denton Bilodeau, Michael Chavez, Dan Lemieux, Tony Flagg, Back row: Fred Ouellette, Lucas Preble, Brandon Anctil, Rob Taylor, Michael Taylor-Hampton, Caleb Berry, Marie Jones, Peter Chavez, Dan Anctil Missing from photo: Aaron Hasting, Randy Luce, Jacob Luce, Grey Ricker, Jacob Foss, Taylia Brewer, Casey Boulay, Ben Nichols.

Awards: Mainely Spirit Champions. Semi-Final rounds at Worcester Polytechnic Institute Regional Finish in 10th place at Pine Tree Regional. Winner of the Industrial Safety Award, and the Judges Award. 2012-13 season: Mainely Spirit September 22th, Mini Maker Fair Sept. 22, Apple Pumpkin Festival September 29th, Car wash Oct. 20th, River Rage Oct 27th,Bottle Drive Nov. 10th,Build season Start Jan 5th every Saturday. 9-3 Thursday 5:30-8:30 until Bag and tag Day Feb. 19th, Worcester Polytechnic Institute Regional March 6-9th , Apple orchard work day Apirl 27, 2013, Pine tree Regional April 3-6th,Beantown Blitz on June 1st,Lego League summer camp June 24 27th, End of Season Barbecue June 25th

2012 Robot: Bowser

Rebound Rumble℠ is played by two competing Alliances on a flat, 27 x 54 foot field. Each Alliance consists of three robots. They compete to score as many basketballs into their hoops as they can during a 2 minute and 15 second match. The higher the hoop in which the basketball is scored, the more points the Alliance receives. The match begins with a 15-second Hybrid Period in which robots operate independently of driver inputs. During this Hybrid Period, one robot on each Alliance may be controlled using a Microsoft Kinect. Baskets scored during this period are worth extra points. For the remainder of the match, drivers control robots and try to maximize their Alliance score by scoring as many baskets as possible. The match ends with robots attempting to balance on bridges located at the middle of the field. In Qualification Matches, a robot from each Alliance will also try to balance on the white Coopertition™ Bridge to score additional ranking points for each Alliance.

Our goal:

Bowser is 3’ 6 long and 3’ wide and a great size to fix on the bridge with other robots. He can shoot consistly into all three hoops. His front frame is bend with a 45 degree angle allowing him to easier go over the middle barrior.   He haas a bridge lower devise and eight wheel drive train. Nobody will be push him around. We are looking forward to working with our alliance partners. We plan balancing on the bridge in every match.

Bowser

2012 The Spruce Mountain Area Robotics Team (S.M.A.R.T.) competed at the FIRST Robotics Challenge (FRC) at Worcester Polytechnic Institute on March 8th-10th and won the Rookie All Star Award. This year’s FRC challenge was called “Rebound Rumble” and required students to build and program a computer controlled robot under 120 pounds that could score points by shooting foam basketballs in hoops at 3 different heights and balancing on a hinged “balance bridge” with other robots.  The Spruce Mountain High School team made an exceptional showing in their rookie season.  During the final awards ceremony, SMART was presented with the Rookie All Star Award, the highest honor a rookie team can achieve.  With this award, the team earned the privilege to attend the FIRST World Festival in St. Louis from April 25th  -28th.

2012 FRC TEAM

The Spruce Mountain Area Robotics Team members 2012: Denton Bilodeau, Sam Brenner, Tom Brenner, Shelby Bryant, Nina Chavez, Michael Chavez, Alexi Deering, Roger Duguay, Chloe Flagg, Adam Gettle, Ian Gingras, Michael Taylor Hampton, Ben Hartford, Dustin Jones, Megan Labbe, Jacob Luce Tyler Ritter, and Erik Taylor. The team is highly indebted to its mentors, including Tony Flagg of F.A.T. Electric, engineer Fred Ouellete, Steve Gettle, a forester and carpenter, Phil Maurais of Maurais Plumbing and Heating, teachers Dan Lemieux, Kym Bryant, Karina Escajeda, and Rob Taylor, and UMF student Jill Gingras. Missing from picture Roger Duguay.

 

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